Rebuild Power Steering Pump (T44, URS4/6, and Small Chassis)

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Rebuild Power Steering Pump (T44, URS4/6, and Small Chassis)

Postby loxxrider » Thu Jun 23, 2016 2:43 pm

I figured I'd copy this over here in case it gets deleted from MG like what happened with Chris Miller's old site. Originally copied to MG by our good ole' yodasfro (Austin).


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Leaking x-plug probably one of the most common problems with older audi's. It's actually a cylinder head and yes there are pistons under them. A seal kit is cheap from autohausaz. Might want to consider switching to mobil 1 ATF or redline PSF as you've found pentosin is not cheap. Make sure you grease the new o-ring. You need a drag-link socket or tool of your own choice to remove and install the plugs. Some say a chisel some say a big screw driver. Look this over(translate with google) http://www.audi100-online.de/Technik/Ti ... ricks.html The following copy pasted from Chris Millers old 200 20v site(accessible via thewaybackmachine)
Tools:

- 13, 15, 17 and 19 mm sockets and open-end wrenches.
- U-joint extension is very helpful but not essential.
- Set of long handled metric Allen keys or hex bit sockets.
- Bench vise and jaw protectors or a couple of pieces of wood.
- Hand-operated siphon (cheap plastic thingy) and turkey baster.
- 3/4" drag-link socket for 1/2" drive, available from professional tools suppliers (Snap-On, MacTools).
* The socket I've used is a 3/8" drive, looks like a giant flat screwdriver (which it probably is). I think the blade is 3/4" wide (19mm x 2mm for my fellow Metric Indoctrinated listers). The whole socket is about 30mm tall. I've gotten it through my favorite McMaster-Carr catalogue. Craftsdude has it in 1/2" drive, it's called a "drag link socket". You'll need a 3/4" one, catalogue P/N 44512, sells for $6.49.

You have to grind the corners off the drag link socket, about 1mm off each side, so that it would fit the cross-shaped slots on the pump's end caps. DO_NOT use a chisel! You'll damage the cross-like slots on the caps. They are made out of fairly soft steel. Torque them back to 50Nm.

- 1/2" or 3/8" hand impact drive (any h/w store -- mine from Home Depot).
- Hammer.

Parts:

- O-ring repair kit (about $20.00 from Carlsen, but I paid
more to Blaufergnuegen instead :-()
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The kit is a genuine ZF-made, and has all O-rings and seals needed. Its Audi p/n is 026 198 049B
----
- 2 litres of CHF 11s

Procedure:

1. Drain hydraulic reservoir with siphon.

2. Disconnect hoses connected with three banjo nuts to the pump (all three are different sizes). The front-most hose is also anchored to the rear of the pump with two bolts. At this point you can move all but the front-most hose out of the way (on the 3B engine .. disregard for older I-5's).

3. Drain as much oil from the pump as possible using the baster (to minimize the amount of oil on your garage floor).

4. Loosen top mounting bolt (about which the pump swings), then the hard-to-reach nut on the tensioning bracket (I used two extensions on my drive), and then the main tension adjusting bolt (U-joint extension really useful for this -- the axis is very close to the radiator housing). Remove the tension adjusting bolt and then the threaded fitting into which it goes.

5. Slip belt off pulley, and swing pump enough to work the front hose end out from under the pump mounting collar. (Applies only to 3B engine).

6. Remove the last mounting bolt and lift pump out (rotate clockwise and lift out vertically on the 3B).

7. Clamp the pulley in the vise (use protectors) and remove the pulley bolts. Then remove the four bolts (two Allen head, two regular) holding the mounting collar to the pump.

* Mark the orientation of the two pump halves so you can put it back together the same way!!! A chisel mark works fine.

8. Clamp the pump in the vise and remove the two long Allen head bolts that hold the two halves of the pump together. They're torqued down quite tight, but come out easily once they break loose.

9. Replace the 6 (?) little O-rings and the big middle one. There were little black pieces of crud in the O-ring channels in mine: I swabbed it clean with Q-tips. The O-rings must be coated with mineral oil before
installation.

10. Remove the two check-valves (hex key, pretty tight) and replace the O-rings.

11. Bolt the two halves back together, and prepare to do the cap seals.

12. Clamp the drag-link socket in the vise and file down the corners by 1 mm on each side so that it fits the slot on the cap screws -- I tapered mine a little to match the shape of the slot. (This is actually pretty easy to do -- I had the impression that sockets were made of sterner stuff).

13. Clamp the pump in the vise, and do the cap seals one by one. The pump's very odd-shaped, so be careful when clamping it -- I had mine work loose a couple of times. (It would not be funny if that pump
were to fall on your foot -- though you'd save your pump!). To remove the cap screw, use the impact driver with your custom drag link socket. For those of you who haven't used one before, you twist it as far as
it will go counterclockwise and hit it with a hammer while doing so. You have to hit pretty hard, but it comes out by hand once it's loose.

14. Fit mounting collar and pulley, and then Mount pump back in the car, but connect the hoses only after filling the pump with oil and rotating the pulley until oil comes out of the farthest port.

15. While reconnecting the front hose, it helps if you screw in the rear mounting bolts loosely first.

16. On the 3B, there are two little metal fingers on which the pump drive belt can easily snag while tensioning the belt. Look carefully to make the belt isn't snagging before you start the engine (I shredded my belt by not doing so ...luckily the belt needed replacement anyway).

17. Refill reservoir with fluid, and start the car. Check for leaks, and rotate the wheel from lock to lock quickly several times to bleed. Make sure the reservoir stays topped up, and bleed until the air bubbles stop.

That should do it. I didn't do the shaft seal, but any shop with a hydraulic press should be able to do it for you.

The seals were in pretty bad shape on my car -- hard, and breaking up. I suspect that this was because some quick-lube place topped the reservoir up (lots of places don't know any better, as I found out the hard way).
-Chris

'91 Audi 200 20v - Revver/BAT project
'91 Audi 200 20v Avant
'01 Anthracite M5
'90 M3
'85 Euro 635csi
'12 X3
E34 530i (maybe rear-mount soon)
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Re: Rebuild Power Steering Pump (T44, URS4/6, and Small Chas

Postby themagellan » Sat Jul 09, 2016 10:04 am

Will be using this - thanks man
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